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Chapter 4  Regular maintenance from the service interval chart

4.1  Change engine oil

At this occasion:

The Owner’s Manual gives a service interval of 4000 km and also says “Every spring or fall.” I interprete this as “at least once per year.” I was first thinking to apply this time limit and manage it in my calendar, however, I have learned that the purpose of the time limit is to capture short distance drivers, not infrequent drivers. Thus, for me a mileage intervall is more appropriate. However, 4000 km seem to be overdone. I go with 8000 km.

The oil prescribed is 20W-50 Castrol. The required quantity is 5 quarts.

On 2013-Jun-20, I have ordered 5 l of Castrol Actevo 4T Motorenöl 20W-50 on amazon.de from KEC GmbH / Vialube for eur 37.45 plus eur 20.50 for shipment.

The oil filter has to be changed with each oil change. The recommened filter is PF-454 AC Delco. The (a little bit too late) quote from Boss Hoss Cycles Houston was $ 13.95.

However, on 2013-Jun-20, I have ordered the Moroso 22300 Chrome Oil Filter1 on eBay from speedunlimited_sales for $ 24.83 plus $ 68.90 for shipment.

Done 2013-Jul-21 at 1033 km, next time at 9033 km.

For the next change, I was thinking to stick with the service interval of 8000 km, however, when Wendy was at the Dealer in the Netherlands for the COC (cf. section 6.4), obviously an oil change had been performed for the camshaft exchange, at least there was a new oil filter and not my chromed Moroso any more. So, I assume that the oil change was done at the km age with which Wendy had left, and as I don’t know what oil was put in, I better plan for a service interval of 4000 km: Done 2013-Oct at 3035 km, next time at 7035 km.

Done 2016-Feb-07 at 7848 km, next time at 11848 km. Again some metallic smear at the magnetic tip of the oil plug. The oil was dark but otherwise seemed to be clean. The content of the oil filter seemed to less clean. Put in 5 liters of Castrol Classic 20W-50 and a new Moroso chrome oil filter.

Done 2017-May-14 at 13535 km, next time at 17535 km. Had ordred a new Moroso chrome oil filter again from partcatalog2 on ebay. Again some metallic smear at the magnetic tip of the oil plug. Filled in about 5 liters of Castrol Classic 20W-50 up to the Full mark, concidering the oil on the back side. During the fill-in, I had convinced myself that indeed the back side is the relevant one.

Done 2017-0418 at 18158 km, next time at 22158 km. This time had ordred two new Moroso chrome oil filters, so oneis still there. Filled up to full, then did a short ride to flood the new oil filter. Afterwards, it was about half, topped off again.

The final check of the oil level shall be noted in section 5.1.

4.2  Check condition of spark plugs and replace if neccesary

Cf. section 4.5.

4.3  Replace oil filter

Cf. section 4.1.

4.4  Inspect air cleaner and service as required

At this ocasion check idle speed adjustment (4.21).

The service interval is 4000 km. The 2 rear bolts (closest to the rider seat) of fuel tank must be removed to service the air filter. The air filter is specified as 735-4906 Napa, but I could not find that one on the web.

Done a few days after 2015-Apr-25 at 3790 km, next time at 7790 km. When sealing the intake manifold (6.5) the air filter had to come off anyway. I had ordered a new one from H. D. Service Venlo.

Done 2016-Feb-21 at 7848 km, next time at 11848 km. When checking the electric choke (cf. section 4.5), I removed the air filter. It was only a bit dirty on one side, spanning about one sixth of its circumference. I only noticed that after I had taken it off, so I don’t know which direction that was on the bike. I reinstalled the filter with the dirty section pointing forward.

Done 2017-Apr-26 at 13262 km, next time at 17262 km. Only looked from behing with lifting, but not removing, the tank. Looked a bit dirty. Next time, I should remove the tank and just rotate the air filter as appropriate.

Done 2018-May-10 at 18508 km, next time at 22508 km. Had ordered a new one from HD service Venlo. It came with a new top cover, but without bottom housing, however, I could reuse the old one. I was first assuming that I need to remove the tank completely, but the filter can be taken out and put in with just removing the rear blots. This works particularly well if the filter proper and the bottom housing are disconnected. I installed the filter so that the area where the beginning and the end of the metal grid slightly overlap points straight backward.

When tank is removed and reinstalled, update “Check fuel valve, …”.

4.5  Replace Spark plugs

There are two separated records in the service interval chart. One says “check and replace if necessary every spring or fall” which I again interprete as “once per year”. The other one says “replace every 15000 miles”, which corresponds to 24000 km.

I will change the spark plugs anyway if I get them out to check, so I go for something in between: Just replace every 16000 km.

The spark plugs are FR5LS AC Delco (gap 0.045″). From Boss Hoss Cycles Houston I got a quote of $ 38.00 for 8 units. Howerver, these spark plugs seem not to be available in Europe, and shipping cost from the US exceed the value by far. It looks like they can be replaced by NGK BCPR5ES. On 2013-Jul-21, I ordered a pack of 10 of these on ebay.co.uk from car_parts_international for £ 18.03 plus £ 7.90 for express shipping.

Done 2013-Aug-10 at 1652 km, next time at 17652 km. The two outer plugs on each side cannot be accessed with a long cylinder plug wrench. Just a 5/8″ fork wrench works fine on them. The gapping on the new plugs looked OK (shall be 1.143 mm), so I left them as they were. Just screwed them carefully in; next time I should use some engine oil on the threads.

Done 2015-Jun at 4800 km, next time at 12800 km. The engine was still starting quite unwillingly when cold, and now it also began to run rough and yerk when opening the throttle. So I ordered another pack of 10 spark plugs from car_parts_international. The old plugs where all heavily black coated, and the gap of one was even bridged by black stuff. Either the engine runs too rich generally or it has been run under bad conditions when it was at the dealer, cf. 6.4; may be it was test run without the electric choke cable connected. Anyway, I put in the new plugs and since then it started and ran just fine. For the time being, I have set the replacement intervall to 8000 km.

Done 2016-Feb-21 at 7848 km, next time at 23848 km. Already when I was diagnosing the ignition (cf. section 6.6), I noticed that the two plugs I got out for checking were again heavily black coated. A little later, Wendy started again to be diffecult to start. I was suspecting that the engine may run too rich because of a faulty electric choke. So I took off fuel tank and air filter, pluged +12 V to the electric choke, and watched it. It started to open and after aobut ten minutes it was completely open. I removed the voltage, and after another ten minutes it was again completey closed. Thus, the electrtic choke works perfectly fine. I am now suspecting that the heat rating of the spark plugs is not correct. Several sources on the internet state the NGK BCPR5ES (which I use) as the appropriate replacement for AC Delco FR5LS. On the other hand, the heat rating goes inversely for AC (higher number means hotter) and NGK (higher number means colder), and as far as one digit heat ratings are concerned, the matchings I saw (AC↔NGK) were 2↔6, 3↔5, 4↔4. This seems to indicate that AC heat rating 5 corresponds more to NGK heat rating 3, so that the NGK BCPR5ES may indeed be colder than the AC Delco FR5LS. Therefore, I put now the originally secified AC Delco FR5LS. I was thinking to get them out to check in 4000 km (if starting problems don’t hit earlier). Howeverer, Wendy starts and runs just fine, so I go back to a service interval of 16000 km.

Done 2018-Jan-01 at 17457 km, next time at 25457 km. After (again) replacing a faulty ignition module, Wendy was starting quite reluctingly, so I replaced the spark plugs which indeed did not look very well. I reduce the change intervall to 8000 km.

4.6  Check and adjust drive belt

The service interval is 4000 km.

For the drive belt, this is conveniently done with the rear tire replacement, cf. section 5.7. Belt tension range: 400–500 ft-lbs.

With the tire change on 2013-Sep-14 at 2784 km, I set the drive belt tension to 1 cm yield under 7 kg (dump bell rod plus 5 kg disk). To adjust the belt to run in the center of the pulley when the wheel is turned was a little bit tricky, but managed to do that. However, after some real riding, the belt is again at one side. The squeaky noises when accelerating are still there.

Done 2015-Mar-22 at 3035 km, next time at 7035 km. That’s what I courageously assume. Wendy was just back from the Netherlands (cf. 6.4), and for the COC, the rear wheel had been temporarily changed for the narrower one. The dealer should have adjusted the drive belt properly (assumed mile age is before shipping to the Netherlands).

Done 2015-Aug-02 at 5987 km, next time at 9987 km. There started to be occasionally squeezing noises which become more and more until they were continuously present. The belt tension seemed to be higher than I use to put it. I saw only about half a centimeter yield under 7 kg. The belt was running at the outside of the wheel pulley. I brought ride side of axis forward (as much as possible); the belt tension was not significantly changes by that. The belt was still running on the outside when turning the wheel by hand. However, a test ride showed that the noise is gone.

Done 2016-Jul-02 at 9501 km, next time at 13501 km. There were squeezing noises in left turns. The belt was running on the outside. I tightened the left tensioner bolt by 1/8 to 1/4 rotation (the right one is already as loose as possible). Now the belt is running on the inside. Noises seem to be a bit less, only occuring when the bike is hot. This is somewhat strange as I suspect the cause of the noises is contact of the belt with the tire, which should be worse with the belt running on the inside.

Done 2017-Jul-02 at 14293 km, next time at 18293 km. The belt was running on the inside. Under load it went to the outside. Some squeezing under load, starting before the belt reached the outside. I could displace the belt about 1 cm with the thumb; felt a little bit softer than I usually have it. I tightened both sides by 1/6 turn. Next morning, I was first thinking that the squeaking is completely gone, but when it was hot in the afternoon, some was still there.

Done 2018-May-10 at 18508 km, next time at 22508 km. Belt seemed not to run on a particular side. Felt a bit soft. Tightened both sides by 2/8 turns. Squeaking seem to have mostly disappeared.

4.7  Check and adjust alternator belt

The service interval is 4000 km.

For the alternator belt, a Gates 5330212 belt is used. The belt has occasionally made squeeky noises since I test rode Wendy. Done 2013-Aug-04 at 1308 km, next time at 5308 km. That was a matter of a minute. I could easily replace the alternator by 1–2 cm just tearing by hand.

The belt seemed still to make some noises, so looked again. Done 2013-Aug-07 at 1478 km, next time at 5478 km.. Now I pulled a little harder. The belt tension now really feels OK. However, there are till some noises when moderately accelerating; I do now sustpect they have another source, probably the drive belt. That one will soon be adjusted with the rear tire change.

Done 2015-Mar-22 at 3035 km, next time at 7035 km. When Wendy was just back from the Netherlands (cf. 6.4), I briefly checked the alternator belt, and it felt OK.

Done 2015-Dec-20 at 7621 km, next time at 11621 km. OK.

Done 2016-Dec-25 at 11769 km, next time at 15769 km. OK.

Done 2017-Sep-14 at 16076 km, next time at 20076 km. Thought I had heard at squeeking at fire up one time, but it felt pretty much OK; left it like that.

4.8  Check rear brake pedal adjustment

This is listed in the regular service chart with an interval of 4000 km. I was first thinking the necessity for this is noticed during normal riding, but it is a good idea to check the brake pedal regularly, as there is just a bolt with a self-securing nut, no second safeguard.

Done 2013-Jun-30 at 535 km, next time at 4535 km. The pedal felt a little bit too low. It was at the center one of three possible positions. I put it in the higher one.

There is another good reason to leave this service in the schedule: When I rinsed the rear brake system (cf. 5.3), I noticed that the two bolts holding the rear brake master cylinder were lose.

Done 2015-Aug-09 at 6165 km, next time at 10165 km. Everything OK.

Done 2016-Aug-13 at 10757 km, next time at 14757 km. Everything OK.

Done 2017-Jul-16 at 14846 km, next time at 18846 km. Everything OK.

Done 2018-Apr-26 at 18416 km, next time at 22416 km. Everything OK.

4.9  Inspect front brake fluid level and condition

Also check brake system for leaks.

The service interval is 4000 km. The specification is DOT 5 Silicone. I will use DOT 4. I have to know what is in there before adding anything. If it is DOT 5, I have to flush the system with cleaning alcohol, like I did for the rear brake, before filling in DOT 4.

Done 2015-Apr-05 at 3712 km, next time at 7712 km. Opened front reservoir to check. Did not see min/max marks. There is kind of an “inner basin”. The level was slightly below the top of it. May be this means slightly below min. However, it looked still OK, and for the time being, I leave it like that.

Done 2015-Dec-20 at 7621 km, next time at 11621 km. Level was as last time. This time, wanted to infer if it is DOT 4 or DOT 5. The color is bright yellowish, similar to DOT 4. I did a couple of tests:

  1. I applied an electric water content tester. It reported zero water. As the brake fluid is at least 21/2 years in there (the time I own the bike), this indicates that it can only be DOT 5.
  2. I took out a few drops and wiped them on a painted surface (an old Honda engine cover which I had sprayed golden decades ago). The paint was not damaged, so this also hints towards DOT 5. However, when I wiped some DOT 4 on the same part for cross checking, it also did not damage the paint. So this result is insignificant. Does DOT 4 really damage paint, as everybody says? May be it takes more time than just a few minutes.
  3. I removed a little bit with a syringe from the reservoir and took up the same amount of DOT 4 with the syringe. Although both yellowish, the colors are sufficiently different to distinguish them. The two liquids do clearly not mix. Not after minutes of shaking, not after leaving in the shelf for days. Thus, it is unambiguously DOT 5.

Therefore, I shall really flush the system with cleaning alcohol and then put DOT 4 in it. After that, I will not change the brake fluid at regular intervals but just based on electric water content checking. Therefore, I have removed the section about regular changes.

Done 2017-Apr-05 at 12850 km, next time at 16850 km. Flushed the system with cleaning alcohol and then put DOT 4. To finally get pressure, I did not use the vacuum pump, but the old fashioned method. My arms are just long enough to reach the lever at the handle bar and the wrench on the flushing nut at the same time even for the left side caliper. The upper end of the inner basin in the reservoir, which I previously suspected to mark the minimum, does now look to me more like the maximum. Anyway, I filled the brake fluid to about that level.

Done 2017-Oct-20 at 17164 km, next time at 21164 km. Basin was exactly full, brake fluid tester showed green.

4.10  Inspect rear brake fluid level and condition

Also check brake system for leaks.

The service interval is 4000 km. The specification is DOT 5 Silicone. However, I have now flushed the system with cleaning alcohol and put in DOT 4.

To check the rear brake liquid container, it requires to remove the right side panel.

On 2013-Aug-02 at 1266 km, I checked the rear brake fluid. There was almost no fluid in the reservoir. Added from my yellow bottle (is that DOT 4?) up to about the middle between min and max.

Done 2015-Apr-05 at 3712 km, next time at 7712 km. Rear was slightly above center.

Done 2015-Jul-16 with the change of the rear brake fluid at 5722 km, next time at 9722 km.

Done 2016-Jul-13 at 9900 km, next time at 13900 km. Level at center, one yellow light on tester.

Done 2017-Jul-02 at 14293 km, next time at 18293 km. Level at center, one red light on tester. Changed the brake fluid for some from an open can which had one yellow light on the tester. In the bike it had in the end two yellow light; should have used an unopened can. Pumping it through was much more efficient with the pedal than with my pump. I got pressure the classical way quickly; remember to remove the caliper and put it upside down. In action the brake works better than before.

Done 2018-Apr-26 at 18416 km, next time at 22416 km. Had one red light on tester. Noted that the tester needs to be submerged completely in order to give a consistent readout. Change the fluid using a new sealed can. Bleeding the classical way with pressing the pedal and quickly losing an re-tightening the bleeding bolt; worked very well.

4.11  Check brake pad lining and discs

The service interval in the Owner’s Manual is 4000 km. However, the calipers have to be removed anyway if the wheels are removed, therefore it may be convenient and sufficient to check the brake pads when a tire change is envisaged and change the pads along with the tire change, if necessary. I should always have a set of brake pads in stock.

Done with the rear tire change 2013-Sep-14 at 2784 km, next time at 6784 km. Lining thickness wass different on inner and outer side. Although I was thinking to do this only with the tire changes, I put the check back in the regular schedule.

Done 2015-Dec-20 at 7621 km, next time at 11621 km. Front is OK, rear is not much left. Like last time, inner and outer thickness looks different. Possibly the caliper is not centered on the (floating) disk. This may also explain the disapointing braking efficiency.

When changing the rear tire, I noted again that the inner pad is thinner than the outer one. I reinstalled the caliper with slightly thicker washers (two of my stainless steel M10). The old washers (three for each bolt, one thicker and two thin ones) are in the M5 compartment of my washer box.

Check done on 2016-Dec-25 at 11769 km. The inner pad need to be replaced now, therefore, I leave this on top of the list. Had already ordered new pads from the Venlo dealer.

Done 2017-Feb-26 at 11942 km, next time at 15942 km. Changed rear pads. Did not remember right away how to get them out: just remove the lock pins and slide bolts out. Braking is much better now. Front pads are still OK.

Done 2017-Sep-13 at 16076 km, next time at 20076 km. Both OK.

4.12  Check antifreeze level and protection strength

The specification is Dex-Cool or equivalent, however, there seem to be quite controversial discussions. For me the bottom line is to stay with the “usual green stuff”. Note that the cylinder head is aluminim, while the block is cast iron, so the coolant should be compatible with that.

The interval given is “every spring or fall”, thus “once per year”. However, there is no coolant reservoir. I think I should check the level more regularly. For the start, I use a service interval of 1000 km. After I have changed the antifreeze for the first time, and as long as only I myself add some, I need not to check the protection strength, just the level.

On 2013-Jul-23, at about 1193 km, after backing her up into the garage, a little bit of coolant came out of the overflow hose. It was obviously the “usual green stuff”, a little bit stinky, but not oily. The next morning, I added about half a liter of tap water, which raised the level so that it was well visible, but still a few centimeter from the top (while on the side stance). So: Done 2013-Jul-24 at 1193 km, next time at 2193 km.

Topped off when replacing coolant: Done 2013-Aug-25 at 2226 km, next time at 3226 km.

Done 2015-Mar-28 at 3694 km, next time at 4694 km. Wendy was just back from the Netherlands (cf. 6.4). When I was putting the bike back in the garage after riding, the ventilator came on and then a little bit of coolant spilled over, although the temperature was not much above 180F. Now I think that the coolant level was not too low but too high (added by the over-cautious dealer), however, I added coolant up to the top. After the next ride, again some coolant spilled over at moderate temperature, probably because I had added too much. Next day with cool engine I checked again: coolant was well visible, just a few centimeters from the top, so this should be fine.

Topped off when replacing coolant: Done ≈2015-Apr-25 at 3790 km, next time at 4790 km.

Done 2015-Aug-09 at 6165 km, next time at 8165 km. With the bike level, it was 1 cm below the bottom of the fill hole bottleneck, so completely fine. I have rechecked the recommended service interval in the owners manual: it says every spring or fall, that is, twice per year, which would translate to every 4000 km for me. So far, I had conservatively assumed an interval of 1000 km. I think I can safely increase it to 2000 km.

Done 2016-Mar-24 at 8065 km, next time at 10065 km. This was 100 km before the schedule. I could neither see the coolant nore reach it with the finger, however, I just needed to add very little before it was again one or two centimeters below the fill hole bottleneck. I keep the checking interval of 2000 km.

Done 2016-Aug-07 at 10624 km, next time at 12624 km. Again just had to add a little bit to bring the level back in view and reach.

Topped off when replacing coolant: Done 2017-Apr-13 at 13039 km, next time at 15039 km.

Done 2017-Aug-06 at 15343 km, next time at 17343 km. Again just added about two cups to bring the level back into view.

Done 2017-Dec-03 at 17340 km, next time at 19340 km. Ditto.

4.13  Clean transmission filter, change transmission oil, and replace magnetic inline transmission filter

There are different service intervalls given for the different elements of this service, although it makes sense to do these all at the same time. There are also different intervalls given in the chart and in the section on the transmission.

For the time being, I assume a service intervall of 8000 km. This may be doubled once the oil looks pretty clean when changed.

The recommended oil is MX4T Mobil 1 Synthetic, however, it seems that this has been renamed to Mobil1 10W40 Racing 4T. The required quantity is 2.75 quarts.

On 2013-Jun-20, I have ordered 3 quarts on eBay from lubeudocom for $ 44.85 plus $ 63.10 for shipment. The (a little bit too late) quote from Boss Hoss Cycles Houston was $ 53.00.

At this occasion, the transmission filter shall be cleaned (no need for replacement). The Magnefine 3/8″ Inline Magnetic Transmission Filter shall be replaced every 32000 km, however, I change it with every transmission oil change.

On 2013-Jun-20, I have ordered the Inline Transmission Filter on eBay from magnefinefilters for $ 18.75 plus $ 12.50 shipment. The (a little bit too late) quote from Boss Hoss Cycles Houston was $ 41.95.

Done 2013-Jun-14 at 923 km, next time at 8923 km.:

Done 2016-Nov-13 at 11626 km, next time at 19626 km.: This time, I put the bike level on stances to pour the oil. Again, there was some metallic smear on the inside of the bottom cover plate. I replaced the transmission filter (the new one ordered from the Venlo dealer, had a steel housing). Once more reused the gasket, without sealing. Put exactly 2.75 quarts of oil; did not really check the level afterwards.

When done this, update also 4.24.

4.14  Check fuel valve, lines, and fittings for leaks

The service interval is 4000 km.

On 2013-Jun-30, after filling the tank really to the top, I noticed fuel pouring onto my right knee, particularly after braking. Back home I looked for the cause and found that on the 1/4″ vent tube on the bottom right side of the tank, the vent hose is missing, which should be routed to the lower rear frame cross member. On 2013-Jul-17, I ordered a blue 6.5 mm fuel hose on ebay from tij-power for eur 36.59 plus eur 17.00 for shipping. On 2013-Aug-02 at 1266 km, I have installed it.

May be the service intervals for this and for changing the fuel filter (5.11) can be equalized and both be done at the same time.

Done a few days after 2015-Apr-25 at 3790 km, next time at 7790 km. When sealing the intake manifold (5.5) fuel tank and carburetor had to come off. So this implied the required checks, I would say.

Done 2016-Feb-21 at 7848 km, next time at 11848 km. I removed fuel tank and air filter to check the electric choke (cf. section 4.5), so this again implied the required checks.

Done 2017-Apr-26 at 13262 km, next time at 17262 km. Only lifted back of the tank.

Done 2017-Nov-19 at 17295 km, next time at 21295 km. Just looked from outside; OK.

4.15  Check oil lines and brake system for leaks

The service interval is 4000 km.

The oil lines are checked with the enginge oil change (4.1).

The brake system is checked with the brake fluid check (4.9, 4.10), however, checked the front brake on 2013-Jun-30 at 591 km.

4.16  Lubricate the front brake hand lever

The service interval is 4000 km.

Done 2013-Oct-12 at 3369 km, next time at 7369 km. Lubricated the junction of the lever from both sides and the contact point to the pushrod with a greased string.

Done 2015-Dec-20 at 7621 km, next time at 11621 km. Lubricated the junction of the lever from both sides.

Done 2016-Dec-25 at 11769 km, next time at 15769 km. Lubricated the junction of the lever from both sides with silicon oil spray.

Done 2017-Sep-13 at 16076 km, next time at 20076 km. Same again.

4.17  Lubricate the throttle cable

The service interval is 4000 km.

As the cable has to be disconnected from the grip in order to lubricate it properly, this should be done when the throttle free play is adjusted anyway (4.21).

4.18  Check tightness of all fasteners

The service interval is 4000 km.

This seems to be pretty general. I will do this by component when servicing it anyway.

Check tire pressure and inspect tread

The Owner’s Manual gives a service interval of 4000 km. I was thinking to check the tire pressure every three month and handle this by my calendar, however, I now prefer to have everything herein scheduled by mileage. I will start with a smaller service interval of 2000 km and increase it if the loss of tire pressure is insignificant.

Done when I had the front tire changed by SASAM on 2013-Aug-03. The mechanic had put 2.5 bar in the front tire, which is usually OK for this tire, but a heavy Boss Hoss should have a little more. The Owner’s Manual says 50 PSI (=3.4 bar) front and 42 PSI (=2.9 bar) rear, where most probably front and rear is swapped. A Boss Hoss forum agrees on 2.8  bar front and 3.0 bar rear for the 300 mm wide. So I increased the front tire pressure to 2.8 bar. The rear tire pressure was way too low, about 1 bar. When increasing it, my pump broke at 2.2 bar, so I left it there for the time being. I will get a new pump and then put it to 3.0 bar. Anyway, already with just 2.2 bar the handling of the bike has improved quite significantly; it now swings easily around corners.

Done 2013-Aug-17 at 1885 km, next time at 3885 km. Got a new pump. Front was 2.6 bar, icreased to 2.8 bar. Rear was 2.2 bar, increased to 3.0 bar; the rear tread depth is now down to about zero. Replaced the valve caps by chrome ones.

Done with rear tire change 2013-Sep-14 at 2784 km, next time at 4784 km. The mechanic hat put 3.0 in the new rear tire, so this was fine. The front tire had 2.5 bar, increased to 2.8 bar.

Done 2015-Mar-24 at 3613 km, next time at 5613 km. Wendy was just back from the Netherlands (cf. 6.4). On the first short ride, I felt like the bike tends to fall into corners a bit. I checked the tire pressure, and it was indeed to hight, 4 bar at the rear and 3.5 bar at the front. However, I left it like that; it will reduce by itself.

Done (can’t recall the date) at 4765 km, next time at 6765 km. The bike felt quite unwilling in curves. The tire pressure was indeed only 1.0 in the front. Increased it to 2.5 (I could not recall the exact correct value at the gas station).

Done 2015-Aug-09 at 6172 km, next time at 7172 km. Again the bike felt unwilling in curves, and again the tire pressure in the front was down to 1.0. Again I increased it to 2.5 (this time I try to memorize that the correct value is 2.8). May be I should have the Avon which was put by the dealer for COC replaced by my old Metzeler. For the time being, I reduce the check interval to 1000 km.

Done 2015-Aug-27 at 6554 km, next time at 6754 km. Again the bike felt unwilling in curves, and the tire pressure in the front was down to 1.5. I increased it to 2.8; the rear one was still slightly above 3.0. The tread of the Avon in the front did also not look too good. I should really have it replaced by my Metzeler. For the time being, I should check the tire pressure with each fuel stop. I reduce the check interval here to 200 km.

Done 2016-Feb-21 at 7856 km, next time at 9856 km. Front was again too low, back still OK. I put the service interval to 2000 km, but will for the time being check the front with each fuel stop.

From now on, I separate tire pressure and tread check.

4.19  Check tire pressure

Service interval for this is kept at 2000 km.

Done 2016-Jul-13 at 9900 km, next time at 11900 km. Rear 2.6 → 3.0, front not checked (currently with each fuel stop).

Done 2016-Jul-13 at 10757 km, next time at 12757 km. New tires rear and front. Put rear to 3.0, front to 2.8.

Done 2016-Oct-106 at 11500 km, next time at 13500 km. The bike felt somewhat unwillingly in bends, so I checked before it was due. Added about 0.5 bar in front and rear tire. Did not significantly change the behaviour.

Done 2017-Apr-05 at 12827 km, next time at 14827 km. Was not yet due, however, the bike felt very stiff in bends. Front: 2.4 → 3.0; rear: 2.8 → 3.2 . Felt better than. May be I should try even higher pressures, 3.5/3.5? I will anyway change this one to be tracked by my calendar, every two month.

4.20  Inspect tread

The Owner’s Manual gives a service interval of 4000 km.

Done 2016-Jul-13 at 9900 km, next time at 10900 km. The rear tire tread is aproching the limit. The front tread depth looks OK, but in general the tire looks strange (and is losing pressure relatively fast). I should have them both changed in the near future. In order to remind myself of this, I reduce the service interval to 1000 km.

Done 2016-Aug-18 at 10757 km, next time at 14757 km. New Metzler rear tire, front Avon replaced by almost new Metzeler. The previous rear tire was replaced at 2784, thus it lasted almost 8000 km. For the next check, I assume a service interval of 4000 km. May be relax it afterwards.

Done 2017-May-20 at 13616 km, next time at 15616 km. The rear was OK, but replaced the front, which was quite worn, not good for ITV. It had (at least) run 1855–3035 and 10757–13616, thus it lasted about 4000 km. I reduce my check interval to 2000 km.

Done 2017-Sep-13 at 16076 km, next time at 18076 km. Front had 3.5–4.5 mm, rear (was new at about 15 400 km) had 4–5 mm, both more in the center.

Done 2018-0418 at 18158 km, next time at 20158 km. Both OK.

4.21  Check engine speed adjustment

The service interval is 4000 km.

Done 2016-May-03 at 8481 km, next time at 12481 km. After I adjusted the ignition timing, the idle speed went up to almost 1000 rpm, thus it also needed adjustment. Just by looking from the side below the tank, it was first not clear to me how the idle speed is adjusted, but a search with the inspection mirror revealed the srew in question. It has a slit, but it is better to use a 1/4” nut. It can be reached without any disassembly by putting a short extension on the nut, then a kardan joint, than a long extension, and then the driver grip. It may be difficult to get it into position if the engine is hot without burning the hand, therefore I put it there with cold engine and then let it warm up idling. I adjusted it to 650 rpm. When I came back from a longer ride, it was about 700 rpm, but sounded just right.

Done 2017-May-04 at 13386 km, next time at 17386 km. Was just right 650–700, with a little rumble but it (almost) never stalls.

Done 2017-Sep-30 at 16764 km, next time at 20764 km. Was not yet due, but Wendy occasionally stalled, and the ignition timing check was due, which is done with idle pulled up to 800 rpm, so I had to adjust the idle speed anyway. It’s now at about 700 rpm.

4.22  Check operation of throttle controls

Also lubricate the throttle cable.

The service interval is 4000 km.

I assume this implies adjustment of throttle free play.

I was first thinking to do this always together with the idle speed adjustment, however, idle speed was pretty much fine while free play was much too large.

Done 2013-Oct-10 at 3235 km, next time at 7235 km. No lubrication.

Done 2015-Dec-20 at 7621 km, next time at 11621 km. OK; no lubrication.

Done 2016-May-03 at 8481 km, next time at 12481 km. Checked it after idle speed adjustemt. Because the idle speed had to be reduced, the free play was less than before, but just right. No lubrication of the throttle cable.

Done 2016-Oct-26 at 11559 km, next time at 15559 km. The throttle could only be opened less then half any more (Still suffcient to get along with a Boss Hoss, but less fun, of course). Opened the throttle grip bracket and found that the little cylinder at the end of the throttle cable had rotated by 90 and was thus blocking the throttle. Rearranged it to correct position and closed everything. After a few throttle pulls, it was again blocked. Removed the throttle grip and found that the part holding the little cylinder looks quite worn. As I happened to be in Pasadena a little later, bought new grips from Boss Hoss California. It was recommened to me to smoothen the area of the throttle grip just below the part that holds the cylinder in order to prevent it to cut the throttle cable. To me it looked already pretty smooth. Anyway, I went over it a few times sideways with a small drill. I put some silicon spray in the top of the cable and then reassembled everything.

Done 2017-Sep-05 at 15811 km, next time at 19811 km. Tiny but present free play — perfect; no lubrication.

4.23  Check operation of all electrical equipment and switches

The service interval is 4000 km.

Done 2013-Oct-12 at 3369 km, next time at 7369 km. All lights are working, just the front brake light switch is working erratically.

Done 2016-Mar-24 at 8065 km, next time at 12065 km. Forget to check high beam. The front brake light switch has mystically recovered. Everything is working, just not the air ride pressure decrease.

Had noted that the headlight bulb is broken. It’s a regular H4; bought a new one at the motorcycle parts shop in Villanueva de la Cañada and changed it on 2017-Feb-26 at 11942 km. It was quite a pain. There is a thread at the inside of the lamp housing. The outer cover rim and an internal holding plate have to be screwed out. For the latter, a special tool is needed. I made one out of a wooden bar and two screws. There are two tiny screws at the bottom of the lamp housing (and two additional holes which are not used (any more)). The front one should in principal secure the outer rim cover, but the allan screw is worn out and cannot really be tightened. The rear one just locks an inner plate against rotation; don’t remove it.

Done 2017-May-04 at 13386 km, next time at 17386 km. The air ride is now gone anyway. The front brake light switch was dead (again), so I solded in the new one I bought quite some time ago in Cologne.

Done 2017-Dec-17 at 17399 km, next time at 21399 km. All working fine.

4.24  Check auto transmission fluid

In the service chart, this in only listed once, after the first 300 miles, and never again. I think it is a good idea to do this once in between the transmission oil changes (where it is done anyway), i e., 4000 km after each change.

Done 2015-Aug-09 at 6247 km, next time at 10247 km. After a longer ride, switching through all gears, and then letting the oil setting for a minute, the level was as it should be already with the bike on the side stance, thus it was in fact a little bit two high. As it was so far not breezed away, it should be fine.

Done 2016-Aug-28 at 10986 km, next time at 14986 km. On the stance: With engine running it was at lower quater of the tube. After letting it settle, it was in the center.

Done with transmission oil change at 11626 km, next time at 15626 km.

Done 2017-Aug-06 at 15343 km, next time at 19343 km. Slightly early, as the check with the transmission oil change was not correclty propagated in my service plan. Anyway, without starting the engine before the check, the bike on the side stance, it was slightly above the middle; should be OK.

4.25  Check battery and clean/check connections

The service interval is 8000 km.

Done with replacing battery at 1885 km, next time at 9885 km.

Done 2013-Aug-25 at 2226 km, next time at 10226 km. Looked for the size of the bolt holding the battery mounting bracket. The size is close to M6, but the M6 thread does not fit.

Done 2015-Mar-22 at 3035 km, next time at 11035 km. When Wendy came back from the Netherlands (cf. 6.4), the battery had been replaced, so I assume this check being done.

Done 2015-Nov-13 with replacing battery at 11626 km, next time at 19626 km. However, I have reduce the interval to change the battery, which equals now service interval here, so I remove the check from the list.

4.26  Check rear shock rubber bushing adjustment

The service interval is 8000 km.

I am not quite sure what this means and if it is applicable at all to my air ride shock absorbers. For the time being, I remove it from the agenda.

When installing the Hyperpro shocks, the upper rubber bushing on the left side came out a bit, and I pushed it back, thus it may make sense to resume this check. Done 2016-Dec-11 at 11746 km, next time at 19746 km.

Done 2017-Feb-19 at 11869 km, next time at 19869 km. Done prematurely after a bad street ride; had forgotten that it is already back in the list.

4.27  Check front fork bearing adjustment

The service interval is 8000 km, however, this is conveniently done with the front tire replacment, cf. section 5.6.

4.28  Check front wheel bearings

The service interval is 32000 km, however, this is conveniently done with the front tire replacment, cf. section 5.6.

4.29  Check rear wheel bearings

The service interval is 32000 km, however, this is conveniently done with the rear tire replacment, cf. section 5.7.

4.30  Change front fork oil

The service interval given in the owners manual is 16000 km.

An educated post on the V8 Bike Riders forum2 says that this was initially comunicated by Boss Hoss, but later it was doubled to 32000 km. The weight of the fork oil is prescribed as 10W in the manuel, but posts in the forum recommend 10W or 15W, depending on local climate. The amount is 750 ml per tube.

Done when new at -5000 km, next time at 27000 km.


1
Cf. http://www.mybikeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=5443
2
http://www.v8bikeriders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24248

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